Health

 

Are you interested in getting the COVID-19 vaccine? See below for where and how to get vaccinated. Please share this information widely with family, friends, and neighbors, especially senior citizens. 

Not sure if you want to get the vaccine? We've compiled some trusted resources to help you make an informed decision. 

This information is current as of 5/6/2021.

Getting the vaccine in Canton Township

  • Canton residents may visit any of the Wayne County Health Department's walk-in vaccine locations. The two closest walk-in locations are:
    • Schoolcraft College VisTaTech Center 18600 Haggerty Rd., Livonia, MI 48152 OPEN: Mon-Sat 8:00 AM - 3:00 PM
    • Wayne County Community College 9555 Haggerty Rd, Belleville, MI 48111 OPEN: Mon-Sat 8:00 AM - 3:00 PM
  • Canton residents who need help scheduling an appointment may call the Township Clerk's office at 734-394-5120 or the Township Supervisor's office at 734-394-5185 Monday - Friday 8:30 AM - 4:30 PM

  • Canton residents who are homebound may call Canton Public Safety at 734-394-5400 and dispatch will take your information. You will then receive a call back, go through a brief screening to verify homebound status, and schedule an appointment for a home visit. On the day of your appointment, a Canton Fire paramedic will come to your home, administer the vaccine, and schedule a follow up appointment for the second dose. Please note: this option is only available to individuals physically unable to leave their homes. 

    Local Retail Pharmacies

    CVS - offers online registration and registration by telephone at 800-746-7287. Same day vaccine appointments are available. 

    Kroger - offers online registration and registration by telephone at 866-211-5320. 

    Meijer - vaccines available by appointment or walk-in. Call the Canton Meijer pharmacy at 734-844-2710 and press 0. 

As the COVID-19 crisis continues and we wait for the vaccine distribution to expand, Booklist a magazine by the American Library Association, has published a list of books focusing on the science behind vaccinations and how misinformation can spread as fast as a deadly virus. These books help separate fact from fiction. 

A smart and compelling examination of the science of immunity, the public policy implications of vaccine denial, and the real-world outcomes of failing to vaccinate. If you have a child in school, you may have heard stories of long-dormant diseases suddenly reappearing--cases of measles, mumps, rubella, and whooping cough cropping up everywhere from elementary schools to Ivy League universities because a select group of parents refuse to vaccinate their children. Between Hope and Fear tells the remarkable story of vaccine-preventable infectious diseases and their social and political implications. While detailing the history of vaccine invention, Kinch reveals the ominous reality that our victories against vaccine-preventable diseases are not permanent--and could easily be undone. In the tradition of John Barry's The Great Influenza and Siddhartha Mukherjee's The Emperor of All Maladies, Between Hope and Fear relates the remarkable intersection of science, technology and disease that has helped eradicate many of the deadliest plagues known to man.

Unlike natural disasters, whose destruction is concentrated in a limited area over a period of days, and illnesses, which have devastating effects but are limited to individuals and their families, infectious disease has the terrifying power to disrupt everyday life on a global scale, overwhelming public and private resources and bringing trade and transportation to a grinding halt. In today's world, it's easier than ever to move people, animals, and materials around the planet, but the same advances that make modern infrastructure so efficient have made epidemics and even pandemics nearly inevitable. And as outbreaks of COVID-19, Ebola, MERS, and Zika have demonstrated, we are woefully underprepared to deal with the fallout. So what can -- and must -- we do in order to protect ourselves from mankind's deadliest enemy? Drawing on the latest medical science, case studies, policy research, and hard-earned epidemiological lessons, Deadliest Enemy explores the resources and programs we need to develop if we are to keep ourselves safe from infectious disease. The authors show how we could wake up to a reality in which many antibiotics no longer cure, bioterror is a certainty, and the threat of a disastrous influenza or coronavirus pandemic looms ever larger. Only by understanding the challenges we face can we prevent the unthinkable from becoming the inevitable. 

Canton Township in cooperation with the Wayne County Health Department and Memorial Healthcare are now offering COVID-19 Testing at Heritage Park, 46202 Heritage Park Road, Canton, MI (North Pavillion Parking Lot). Testing will be available Monday - Friday from 9:00 am to 6:30 pm and Saturdays from 9:00 am to 1:00 pm. To pre-register go to www.memorialclarity.com

PLEASE NOTE: At this time, this is site is conducting testing only.
 

Breast Cancer Awareness Month

Every year, 42,000 women lose their fight against breast cancer. Breast Cancer Awareness Month raises awareness of the disease and helps provide support to those affected by breast cancer. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, many women have put scheduling their mammograms on hold. So is it safe to get your mammogram? Doctors and hospitals have put extra precautions in place to ensure the safety of patients. And studies have shown the most effective weapon in the fight against breast cancer is screening. So call your specialist today and don't delay getting your mammogram. Here's some resources to learn more about breast health!

As a health-care journalist, Kate Pickert knew the emotional highs and lows of medical treatment well -- but always from a distance, through the stories of her subjects. That is, until she was unexpectedly diagnosed with an aggressive type of breast cancer at the age of 35. As she underwent more than a year of treatment, Pickert realized that the popular understanding of breast care in America bears little resemblance to the experiences of today's patients and the rapidly changing science designed to save their lives. After using her journalistic skills to navigate her own care, Pickert embarked on a quest to understand the cultural, scientific and historical forces shaping the lives of breast-cancer patients in the modern age. Breast cancer is one of history's most prolific killers. Despite billions spent on research and treatments, it remains one of the deadliest diseases facing women today. From the forests of the Pacific Northwest to an operating suite in Los Angeles to the epicenter of pink-ribbon advocacy in Dallas, Pickert reports on the turning points and people responsible for the progress that has been made against breast cancer and documents the challenges of defeating a disease that strikes one in eight American women and has helped shape the country's medical culture. Drawing on interviews with doctors, economists, researchers, advocates and patients, as well as on journal entries and recordings collected over the author's treatment, Radical puts the story of breast cancer into context, and shows how modern treatments represent a long overdue shift in the way doctors approach cancer -- and disease -- itself.

For a moment, close your eyes, quiet your thoughts and take a slow, deep breath. This simple breathing technique is one of the best ways to lower the stress level in your body. When your lungs take a deep inhale in and a slow exhale out, it sends a message to the brain to unwind and relax. Wherever or whenever, breathing exercises can reduce tension in your muscles, lowers the blood pressure, and calms the frayed nerves. Focusing on your breath can restore a sense of peace and positivity in your day. Google has an easy 1 Minute Breathing Exercise. Want to learn more? Check out these resources!

There is nothing more essential to our health and well-being than breathing: take air in, let it out, repeat 25,000 times a day. Yet, as a species, humans have lost the ability to breathe correctly, with grave consequences. Journalist James Nestor travels the world to figure out what went wrong and how to fix it. The answers aren't found in pulmonology labs, as we might expect, but in the muddy digs of ancient burial sites, secret Soviet facilities, New Jersey choir schools, and the smoggy streets of São Paulo. Nestor tracks down men and women exploring the hidden science behind ancient breathing practices like Pranayama, Sudarshan Kriya, and Tummo and teams up with pulmonary tinkerers to scientifically test long-held beliefs about how we breathe. Modern research is showing us that making even slight adjustments to the way we inhale and exhale can jump-start athletic performance; rejuvenate internal organs; halt snoring, asthma, and autoimmune disease; and even straighten scoliotic spines. None of this should be possible, and yet it is. Drawing on thousands of years of medical texts and recent cutting-edge studies in pulmonology, psychology, biochemistry, and human physiology, Breath turns the conventional wisdom of what we thought we knew about our most basic biological function on its head. You will never breathe the same again. 

Mindfulness with Reset Brain and Body

woman meditating

Mindfulness is the idea of focusing your awareness on the present moment. It affords many health benefits, stress reduction, and increases your gratitude of everyday moments.

On August 20, join us for a virtual day of mindfulness with Reset Brain and Body, based out of Plymouth.

At 2pm, Bridget will teach kids and families mindfulness.

At 6pm, Holly will lead adults in how to start a mindfulness practice. 

Participants will receive a code to access Mindfulness 101, an e-book created by Reset Brain and Body. 

This program will take place virtually over Zoom. Participants will receive an email with the Zoom link the day before the program starts (on August 19). Registration is required, and begins on August 6. 

If you are registering for the 2pm session, please register just one of your family members, and include the age(s) of your family members who will be attending, so we can best tailor the program to you!

Upcoming sessions

There are no upcoming sessions available.

If it's about time for a change of scenery, bicycling is a great way to escape. Biking offers benefits to your health, your finances, and the environment. It's easy to hop on your bike and take a ride with no particular destination. And if you build your bicycle knowledge and skills, who knows where the ride might take you. Check out the links below to get all the info on bicycling. Be safe and wear a helmet. 

Head back to the 62 Days of Summer page for more ways to participate in the summer program!

Michigan Bike Laws, Health, and Safety

The CDC recommends wearing a cloth mask in public settings when it is difficult to maintain social distancing. There are several easy ways to make your own mask - for those who have have some simple sewing skills, and for those who do not. The CDC provides clear instructions on everything from how to make a mask, the correct way to wear it, and how to clean it. Another good source of simple mask-making instructions can be found at Masks4All.

It's important to stay home to slow the spread of COVID-19, and if you must go out, to practice social distancing. But while we stay home, don't let fear and anxiety become overwhelming. Helpful advice is available from many resources, including the CDC, the American Heart Association, Johns Hopkins Medicine, the Mayo Clinic, and WebMD. The library's emedia collection also contains many titles, a few of which are listed here.

MDHHS logo

If you are struggling with uncertainty, fear, and isolation during the COVID-19 crisis, or any other non-emergency mental health concerns, free help is available by phone. Call 888-PEER-753 (888-733-7753)  to speak with a Certified Peer Support Specialist. The call is free, provided by the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services (MDHHS). Lines are open seven days a week, 10 AM to 2 AM.

The State of Michigan MDHHS has launched these warmlines to connect people struggling with persistent mental health challenges to certified peer support specialists who have lived experiences of behavioral health issues, trauma or personal crises.

This is not a substitute for emergency mental health care. Individuals in crisis, including those considering suicide, are urged to contact the Disaster Distress Helpline 24/7 at 800-985-5990 or the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline 24/7 at 800-273-8255.

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