History

January 1, 1660. Samuel Pepys began writing his famous diary in which he chronicled life in London  - including the Great Plague during 1664 and 1665, and the Great Fire of 1666.

January 1, 1863. The Emancipation Proclamation was issued by President Abraham Lincoln, freeing the slaves in the states rebelling against the Union.

January 1, 1892. Ellis Island was opened in New York Harbor. Over 20 million immigrants were processed there until it closed in 1954.

Check out these new titles recently added to the Library's History shelves.

December 1, 1919.  Lady Nancy Astor became the first woman in the British House of Commons.

December 1, 1955.  Rosa Parks was arrested in Montgomery, Alabama, for refusing to give up her seat to a white man and move to the back section of a municipal bus. This action resulted in a year-long boycott of the city's  bus system by African Americans.

December 1, 1988.  Benazir Bhutto was nominated to become prime minister of Pakistan, later becoming the first woman to govern a Muslim nation

Check out these new titles recently added to the Library's History shelves.

“It is curious that physical courage should be so common in the world and moral courage so rare.”
― Mark Twain 

Profiles in courage by 1917-1963 John F. (John Fitzgerald) Kennedy

On November 11 every year, is the federal holiday honoring and celebrating all veterans who have served in the United States military. Did you know Veteran's Day was known by another name? At the end of World War I, a truce was declared at the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month of 1918 between the Allies and Germany. On June 1, 1954 Congress passed a bill renaming Armistice with Veterans and President Dwight D. Eisenhower, who served as a 5-star general in World War II, signed the bill into law. Some government service buildings and schools will be closed. But our library will be open so come on in and check out some of our materials honoring our veterans!

Every Man a Hero is the unforgettable story not only of what happened in the incredible and desperate hours on Omaha Beach, but of the bravery and courage that preceded them, throughout the Second World War--from the sands of Africa, through the treacherous mountain passes of Sicily, and beyond to the greatest military victory the world has ever known. 

Marine Sgt. John Peck survived an IED during the War on Terror that left him with a traumatic brain injury, amnesia, and cost him his marriage. He survived another three years later, one that left him with three and a half limbs missing. He's one of only two living people to survive the flesh-eating fungus he contracted in recovery at Walter Reed, one that left him as a quadruple amputee. And that's only the beginning of his story.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - History