History

Check out some of these recent titles on the eternal city of Rome, from ancient times to the present.

September 1, 1939. Hitler's armies invaded Poland, igniting the start of World War Ii.

September 2, 1666. The Great Fire of London began, raging for three days.

September 3, 1783. The Treaty of Paris, ending the Revolutionary War, was signed by John Adams, Ben Franklin and John Jay.

Fifty-five years ago, on August 9, 1974, Richard Nixon became the first American president to resign his office. Learn about what led to this historic event by checking out some of the Library's many resources on the topic.

All the President's men by 1944- Carl Bernstein
The final days by 1943- Bob Woodward

Recounts the events that led Timothy McVeigh to that day and recounts the stories of the survivors, first-responders, US Marshals, FBI investigators, and journalists who covered the events. The film provides an in-depth and provocative exploration of the white supremacist, extremist militia movement that rose to prominence in the early 1990s and still makes news today..

Anne Frank : the biography by Melissa Müller

August 1, 1944.  Anne Frank wrote her last entry into her diary. Three days later, Anne and her family were arrested and sent to Nazi concentration camps.

Columbus : the four voyages by Laurence Bergreen

August 3, 1492.  Christopher Columbus set sail from Spain, with three ships, the Nina, the Pinta and the Santa Maria.

August 6, 1945.  The first atomic bomb was dropped on the city  of Hiroshima, Japan  by the American B-29 bomber Enola Gay.

Celebrate the 50th anniversary of the first moon landing by watching some of these fascinating films on the race to be the first to the moon.

Following ratification by the state of Virginia, The Bill of Rights became law on December 15, 1791. Comprised of the first 10 amendments to the Constitution, they were written by James Madison in response to requests from several states for greater constitutional protection for individual liberties. The First Amendment reads as follows:

"Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances."

Learn about the long history of dissent in America by checking out some of the following resources available in the Library's collection.

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