History

A vivid and colorful history of the most dominant royal dynasty in English history, from Richard the Lionheart and Edward the Black Prince to Henry IV and Richard III.

An epic tale of eight women whose lives -- marked by fortune and poverty, power and powerlessness -- encompass the spectacle, opportunity, and depravity of Italy's Renaissance. Lucrezia Turnabuoni, Clarice Orsini, Beatrice d'Este, Isabella d'Este, Caterina Sforza, Giulia Farnese, Isabella d'Aragona, and Lucrezia Borgia shared the riches of their birthright : wealth, political influence, and friendship, but none were not exempt from personal tragedies, exile, and poverty.

A delightful exploration of France's quirky, literary, and culinary heritage. From absinthe and catacombs to former French soccer player Zinedine Zidane, Eatwell leaves no stone unturned, taking readers off the beaten path to explore the kind of information that gets missed in guidebooks and 'official' information sources.

Did you know that July is National Ice Cream Month? Check out some titles on this cool, summer treat!

Ripe seasonal fruits. Fragrant vanilla, toasted nuts, and spices. Heavy cream and bright liqueurs. Chocolate, chocolate, and more chocolate. Every luscious flavor imaginable is grist for the chill in The Perfect Scoop, pastry chef David Lebovitz’s gorgeous guide to the pleasures of homemade ice creams, sorbets, granitas, and more.

The Ultimate Ice Cream Book contains enough recipes to fill your summer days with delicious frozen desserts -- but after acquainting yourself with this book's hundreds of tempting concoctions, you'll want to use it every day of the year. With over 500 recipes, author Bruce Weinstein has put together the most comprehensive cookbook of its kind, covering just about every conceivable flavor of ice cream, sorbet, and granita; dozens of different recipes for shakes, malts, and other cold drinks; how to make your own ice cream cones; and toppings galore

Ice cream is more fun with friends, but also with cones, sprinkles, candied nuts, hot honey--you get where we're going. So the editors of Food52 brought together sixty well-tested recipes for frozen desserts of all styles and a billion (give or take a few) ideas for toppings and add-ons

Boston's massacre by Eric Hinderaker

On the night of March 5, 1770, British soldiers fired into a crowd gathered in front of Boston's Custom House, killing five people. Denounced as an act of unprovoked violence and villainy, the event that came to be known as the Boston Massacre is one of the most familiar incidents in American history, yet one of the least understood. Eric Hinderaker revisits this dramatic episode, examining in forensic detail the facts of that fateful night, the competing narratives that molded public perceptions at the time, and the long campaign afterward to transform the tragedy into a touchstone of American identity.

The Fourth of July holiday serves as an inspiration to look back at the beginning of the United States. The following materials might interest readers who enjoy the early history of our country, or who like learning new and surprising things. Click on the titles for location and availability.

Shares the stories of remarkable women who shaped American history between 1796 and 1828, including Dolley Madison, Isabella Graham, and Sacajawea.

The true story of James Armistead Lafayette--a slave who spied for George Washington's army during the American Revolution. But while America celebrated its newfound freedom, James returned to slavery. His service hadn't qualified him for the release he'd been hoping for. For James the fight wasn't over; he'd helped his country gain its freedom, now it was time to win his own.

Scar : a Revolutionary War tale by Jennifer Ann Mann

Unable to enlist in the army due to a childhood injury, Noah Daniels watches the Revolution from his farm in New York until a raid on his settlement thrusts him into one of the bloodiest battles of the American Revolution, and ultimately, face to face with the enemy.

July 1, 1867. The Constitution Act, 1867 is enacted,  uniting the three separate colonies of the Province of Canada, Nova Scotia, and New Brunswick into a single Dominion within the British Empire called Canada.

The Constitution : an introduction by Michael Stokes Paulsen

July 2, 1788. The United States Constitution was ratified.

July 2, 1881. President James A. Garfield was shot as he entered a railway station in Washington, D.C. He died on September 19.

July 2, 1964. President Lyndon B. Johnson signed the Civil Rights of 1964 into law.

Canada Day celebrates the 1867 enactment of the Constitution Act which united the three colonies of New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, and the Province of Canada (Ontario and Quebec) into a single country. In honor of our northern neighbor read about some of her most illustrious native sons and daughters, past and present. For information on the history of Canada you can check here. For more noteworthy Canadians check here.

A dual portrait of the irrepressible orphan Anne of Green Gables and her creator covers such topics as the death of Montgomery's mother, her life on Prince Edward Island, and the inspiration for the "e" at the end of Anne's name..

An engaging, brilliant exploration of the life and work of the most famous architect of our time, and one of the few architects ever to be widely admired by both critics and the general public It discusses at length his major buildings: from his own house--an "exploded" Dutch Colonial in Santa Monica--to the Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao, which has almost single-handedly transformed contemporary architecture.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - History