Nonfiction

For children, reading level and experience level are not always the same. Eager readers are often interested in ideas and topics that seem advanced, but situations and subjects that sixth graders can handle with aplomb may be emotionally confusing for a younger child. Early and eager readers deserve stories they can get into, information that's challenging and up-to-date, and ideas that are new and stimulating, all while remaining age appropriate. Here, children's lit expert Isaacs offers 300 book recommendations for early able readers ages 4-10, honing in on writing that will challenge but not frustrate young readers. 

Teach your baby how to sign. Children can look at the picture, feel the touches, and learn to sign! The book features 25 signs and first words that your child should be using by age two. And all of this is provided in a sturdy, lightweight board book with touch and feels on every spread that's just right for little fingers to handle on their own!.

Bestselling author Eric Rosswood covers every aspect of fatherhood for gay men in this essential guide to growing your family in the post-DOMA era. Unlike other parenting books that have whole chapters focusing on things specifically related to mothers (such as how to get the perfect latch when breastfeeding), this parenting book replaces those sections with things relevant to gay dads. It covers topics like how to find LGBT friendly pediatricians, how to find LGBT friendly schools, how to childproof your home with style, how to answer awkward and prying questions about your family from strangers, examples for what two-dad families can do on Mother's Day, and much more.

A beloved culinary historian's short takes on six famous women through the lens of food and cooking--what they ate and how their attitudes toward food offer surprising new insights into their lives.

In 1913, the Romanov dynasty celebrated its tercentenary--three centuries of autocratic rule over one of the world's mightiest and most expansive empires. Four years later, the monarchy lay in ruins and a brutal struggle had begun to fill the vacuum of power. The Russian Revolution utterly re-shaped the landscape of the twentieth century. To mark the centennial of this epochal event, distinguished scholar Laura Engelstein offers a full history of not just the February and October Revolutions but the critical period surrounding and giving rise to them, beginning with the outbreak of World War One and following through until the end of the civil strife--seven years of violence and chaos that finally left the Bolsheviks in command of the field.

December 1, 1919.  Lady Nancy Astor became the first woman in the British House of Commons.

December 1, 1955.  Rosa Parks was arrested in Montgomery, Alabama, for refusing to give up her seat to a white man and move to the back section of a municipal bus. This action resulted in a year-long boycott of the city's  bus system by African Americans.

December 1, 1988.  Benazir Bhutto was nominated to become prime minister of Pakistan, later becoming the first woman to govern a Muslim nation

Camp David is American diplomacy's secret weapon. The home of the 2015 GCC and 2012 G8 summits, the 2000 Peace Summit, and the 1978 Peace Accords, the camp has played a vital role in American history over the past century, inviting Presidents and international leaders alike to converge, converse, and, perhaps most importantly, relax. A peaceful mountaintop setting, crucially removed from the constant scrutiny of the press, Camp David has served as both a site of critical diplomacy and unparalleled tranquility.

Cemeteries are crucial for any genealogist's search, and this book will show you how to search for and analyze your ancestors' graves. Discover tools for locating tombstones, tips for traipsing through cemeteries, an at-a-glance guide to frequently used gravestone icons, and practical strategies for on-the-ground research. 

Relying on the latest scholarship, Gates leads us on a romp through African American history and gossip in question and answer format: Who was the first African American? What was the second Middle Passage? Did black people own slaves? Why was cotton king? Who was the first black president in North America? How much African ancestry does the average African American have? Who really invented "the talented tenth"? What were the biggest acts of betrayal within the enslaved community? Who was the first black American woman to be a self-made millionaire? 

This book is the first to explore photographic representations of Detroit during the hours from dusk until dawn, featuring work by artists including Robert Frank, Leni Sinclair, Steve Shaw, Russ Marshall, and Dave Jordano, among others. The city's streets, architecture, vast industrial complexes, night clubs, and unique subcultures are captured here in otherworldly visions of the nighttime urban landscape from the 1950s to the present day. These images offer a unique interpretation of Detroit, its industry, culture, and turbulent history through the second half of the 20th century and into the 21st.

In The History of the Future, McPherson reexamines American places and the space between history, experience, and myth. Private streets, racism, and the St. Louis World's Fair; fracking for oil and digging for dinosaurs in North Dakota boomtowns-Americana slides into apocalypse in these essays, revealing us to ourselves.

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