Books

Who really benefits from urban revival? Cities, from trendy coastal areas to the nation's heartland, are seeing levels of growth beyond the wildest visions of only a few decades ago. But vast areas in the same cities house thousands of people living in poverty who see little or no new hope or opportunity. Even as cities revive, they are becoming more unequal and more segregated. What does this mean for these cities--and the people who live in them? In The Divided City, urban practitioner and scholar Alan Mallach shows us what has happened over the past 15 to 20 years in industrial cities like Pittsburgh, Detroit, Cleveland, and Baltimore, as they have undergone unprecedented, unexpected revival. He draws from his decades of experience working in America's cities, and pulls in insightful research and data, to spotlight these changes while placing them in their larger economic, social, and political context. Mallach explores the pervasive significance of race in American cities and looks closely at the successes and failures of city governments, nonprofit entities, and citizens as they have tried to address the challenges of change. The Divided City offers strategies to foster greater equality and opportunity. Mallach makes a compelling case that these strategies must be local in addition to being concrete and focusing on people's needs education, jobs, housing and quality of life. Change, he argues, will come city by city, not through national plans or utopian schemes. This is the first book to provide a comprehensive, grounded picture of the transformation of America's older industrial cities. It is neither a dystopian narrative nor a one-sided "the cities are back" story, but a balanced picture rooted in the nitty-gritty reality of these cities. The Divided City is imperative for anyone who cares about cities and who wants to understand how to make today's urban revival work for everyone.--Amazon.com.

"A unique, revelatory portrait of small-town America: the activities, changes, and events that shape this mostly unseen part of our national landscape, and the issues and concerns that matter to the ordinary Americans who make these towns their home. For the last five years, James and Deborah Fallows have been traveling across America in a single-prop airplane, visiting small cities and meeting civic leaders, factory workers, recent immigrants, and young entrepreneurs, seeking to take the pulse and discern the outlook of an America that is unreported and unobserved by the national media. Attending town meetings, breakfasts at local coffee shops, and events at local libraries, they have listened to the challenges and problems that define American lives today. Our Towns is the story of their journey--an account of their visits to twenty-one cities and towns: the individuals they met, the stories they heard, and their portrait of the many different faces of the American future"--.

"How will climate change affect our lives? Where will its impacts be most deeply felt? Are we doing enough to protect ourselves from the coming chaos? In Extreme Cities, Ashley Dawson argues that cities are ground zero for climate change, contributing the lion's share of carbon to the atmosphere, while also lying on the frontlines of rising sea levels. Today, the majority of the world's megacities are located in coastal zones, yet few of them are adequately prepared for the floods that will increasingly menace their shores. Instead, most continue to develop luxury waterfront condos for the elite and industrial facilities for corporations. These not only intensify carbon emissions, but also place coastal residents at greater risk when water levels rise. In Extreme Cities, Dawson offers an alarming portrait of the future of our cities, describing the efforts of Staten Island, New York, and Shishmareff, Alaska residents to relocate; Holland's models for defending against the seas; and the development of New York City before and after Hurricane Sandy. Our best hope lies not with fortified sea walls, he argues. Rather, it lies with urban movements already fighting to remake our cities in a more just and equitable way. As much a harrowing study as a call to arms Extreme Cities is a necessary read for anyone concerned with the threat of global warming, and of the cities of the world."--Publisher's description.

Buongiorno! Have you been interested in learning another language but haven't had a chance to make it to Bilingual Storytime? Fear not, here is what we did August 2nd in our Italian/English Bilingual Storytime. We had a great time learning how to count to ten in Italian. Enjoy!

 

Stories and Songs from Storytime

We took some time to sing our ABC's, listen to Skinnamarink, and do a bit of Jumping and Counting (by the awesome Jim Gill) so that we could be ready to count in English before tackling our number in Italian.

Stories we read:

The acclaimed author of the phenomenal Sookie Stackhouse novels, Charlaine Harris introduces a Southern librarian whose bookish bent for murder gets her involved in real-life mysteries.

Real Murders--

Georgia librarian Aurora "Roe" Teagarden belongs to a club called Real Murders, which meets once a month to analyze famous cases. But after she finds a member dead, killed in a manner that eerily resembles the crime the club was about to discuss, Roe has to uncover the person behind a terrifying game, one that casts all the members of Real Murders, herself included, as prime suspects-or potential victims.

A Bone to Pick--

When a deceased acquaintance names Roe as heir to a substantial estate, which includes money, jewelry-and a house complete with a skull hidden in a window seat-Roe concludes that the elderly woman has purposely left her a murder to solve. She must identify the victim and figure out which one of Jane's ordinary-seeming neighbors is a murderer-without putting herself in deadly danger.

Unique, simple approach to the complicated college prep process, from the leading authority in college admissions. Getting ready for college is a complicated and confusing process -- how do you know when to take the SAT? When do you start applying to schools? What classes should you be taking to help prepare you for college-level work? Is there anything you should do before high school? Fiske Countdown to College is a comprehensive collection of simple, easy-to-use checklists that spell out your road map for each year of high school and make preparation for college a breeze. There are 28 "to-do" lists for parents and students, ten "don't" lists, three "top 10" lists, and two glossaries, divided by year, that walk you through high school to college. Quotes from students, parents, and counselors offer advice and support from people who've been through all of this before.

Every college and university has a story, and no one tells those stories like former New York Times education editor Edward B. Fiske. That's why, for 35 years, the Fiske Guide to Colleges has been the leading guide to 320+ four-year schools, including quotes from real students and information you won't find on college websites. Fully updated and expanded every year, Fiske is the most authoritative source of information for college-bound students and their parents. Helpful, honest, and straightforward, the Fiske Guide to Colleges delivers an insider's look at what it's really like to be a student at the "best and most interesting" schools in the United States, plus Canada, Great Britain, and Ireland--so you can find the best fits for you

The experts at The Princeton Review have been helping students, parents, and educators achieve the best results at every stage of the education process since 1981. The Princeton Review has helped millions succeed on standardized tests, and provides expert advice and instruction to help parents, teachers, students, and schools navigate the complexities of school admission. In addition to classroom courses in over 40 states and 20 countries, The Princeton Review also offers online and school-based courses, one-to-one and small-group tutoring as well as online services in both admission counseling and academic homework help.

Nonfiction Book Group September 2018

Please join us as Nonfiction Book Group reads:

Also available in: audiobook | e-audiobook

The Spanish flu of 1918-1920 was one of the greatest human disasters of all time. It infected a third of the people on Earth--from the poorest immigrants of New York City to the king of Spain, Franz Kafka, Mahatma Gandhi and Woodrow Wilson. But despite a death toll of between 50 and 100 million people, it exists in our memory as an afterthought to World War I. In this gripping narrative history, Laura Spinney traces the overlooked pandemic to reveal how the virus travelled across the globe, exposing mankind's vulnerability and putting our ingenuity to the test.

Upcoming sessions

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Do you love animals? Facebook and Instagram offers many furry friends you can follow. Oh, and some have even authored books too! ;-) How cool is that?! Check them out here!

This follow-up to Jenkins's best-selling memoir Esther the Wonder Pig picks up exactly where the first book left off, as Jenkins, his partner and coauthor Derek Walter, and their animal family make the move to a farm in Campbellville, Ontario. Using his trademark self-deprecating humor, Jenkins, aided by writer Caprice Crane and Walter, chronicles the zany misadventures that accompany their effort to transform the derelict farm into a successful sanctuary for rescues. Readers will share in the drama as Esther develops a "teenage" attitude and escapes the farm, challenges emerge with over-reaching volunteers, and Jenkins and Walter struggle with isolation and loneliness as they settle into country life far away from old friends and jobs. Jenkins is refreshingly candid about the huge learning curve that defined the sanctuary's early years and rightfully proud of its success (to date they have taken in more than 50 rescued animals). Includes 14 "Esther-approved" (vegan) recipes. 

The New Bookshelf is stuffed with great stories and new characters. Be sure to spend some time with them this summer.

When Lizzie and Gael share an irresistible challenge, to find the peacock ring that once belonged to artist Frida Kahlo, Paloma decides it is the perfect way to honor her father.

This year marks the 30th anniversary of the Adult Contemporary Book Discussion Group! We've compiled a list of our favorite books over the years. Maybe your book club is looking for recommendations or maybe you are interested in joining our group. We meet every 3rd Monday of the month at 7PM in the Community Room. 

The nightingale by Kristin Hannah

"Viann and Isabelle have always been close despite their differences. Younger, bolder sister Isabelle lives in Paris while Viann lives a quiet and content life in the French countryside with her husband Antoine and their daughter. When World War II strikes and Antoine is sent off to fight, Viann and Isabelle's father sends Isabelle to help her older sister cope. As the war progresses, it's not only the sisters' relationship that is tested, but also their strength and their individual senses of right and wrong. With life as they know it changing in unbelievably horrific ways, Viann and Isabelle will find themselves facing frightening situations and responding in ways they never thought possible as bravery and resistance take different forms in each of their actions. Vivid and exquiste in its illumination of a time and place that was filled with great monstrosities, but also great humanity and strength, Kristin Hannah's novel will provoke thought and discussion that will have readers talking long after they turn the last page"--.

Famed aviator and renowned racehorse trainer Beryl Markham is only one of the subjects of McLain's captivating new novel. The other is Kenya, the country that formed the complicated, independent woman whom Markham would become. Like her father who raised her, she falls under the spell of Kenya's lush valleys and distant mountains. Here she nurtures her affinity for animals in the wild and learns to breed and tame the most recalcitrant thoroughbreds. But when war and weather affect life at their farm in Ngoro, Beryl's father pressures the 16-year-old into marrying a much older, financially stable neighbor, setting in motion Markham's long history of fleeing the constraints of relationships that threaten her keen desire to live life on her own terms. Only on the back of a horse, at the wheel of a car, or, later, flying over her beloved -Africa does she feel fully alive and free. Drawing on Markham's own memoir, West with the Night, McLain vividly introduces this enigmatic woman to a new generation of readers. 

 

Did you miss our English-Russian Storytime? Don't worry, here's what you missed, plus a few more suggestions to inspire a multilingual storytime you can do at home. 

From Storytime

 

We tried "Rushing Around in Russia," which goes like this:

 

 

     We were rushing around in Russia but we stopped to say hello.

     доброе утпо (say "DOBRO'YE UTRO")

     Good morning

     Then we were soon on the go.

 

     We were rushing around in Russia during the middle of the day.

     добрый день (say "DOBREE  D'YEN")

     Good Afternoon

     Then we hurried on our way.

 

     We were rushing around in Russia during a star-filled night.

     добрый вечер (say "DOBREE  V'YECHER")

     Good evening

     Then we were quickly out of sight.

 

Fashion is made up of so many components--imagination, illustration, art. There are patterns, styles, assorted materials, and wildly amazing sewing skills. Enjoy this look at how these fashion foward thinkers got their start in the world.

When two young rising stars designer Hubert de Givenchy and actress Audrey Hepburn cross paths for the first time it's magic...literally, the perfect fit!.

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