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July is National Ice Cream Month!

Did you know that July is National Ice Cream Month? Check out some titles on this cool, summer treat!

Ripe seasonal fruits. Fragrant vanilla, toasted nuts, and spices. Heavy cream and bright liqueurs. Chocolate, chocolate, and more chocolate. Every luscious flavor imaginable is grist for the chill in The Perfect Scoop, pastry chef David Lebovitz’s gorgeous guide to the pleasures of homemade ice creams, sorbets, granitas, and more.

The Ultimate Ice Cream Book contains enough recipes to fill your summer days with delicious frozen desserts -- but after acquainting yourself with this book's hundreds of tempting concoctions, you'll want to use it every day of the year. With over 500 recipes, author Bruce Weinstein has put together the most comprehensive cookbook of its kind, covering just about every conceivable flavor of ice cream, sorbet, and granita; dozens of different recipes for shakes, malts, and other cold drinks; how to make your own ice cream cones; and toppings galore

Ice cream is more fun with friends, but also with cones, sprinkles, candied nuts, hot honey--you get where we're going. So the editors of Food52 brought together sixty well-tested recipes for frozen desserts of all styles and a billion (give or take a few) ideas for toppings and add-ons

Bilderback (Mug Cakes) brings homemade ice cream to specialty-appliance-free -kitchens with this accessible collection of frozen desserts, ranging from stand-alone scoops (e.g., vanilla ice cream, cappuccino sherbet, bananas foster sorbet) to plated pleasures (e.g., baked Alaska, ice cream cake).

Check out the titles below for some more information on the history of ice cream. 

From milk to ice cream by Stacy Taus-Bolstad

Color photos and simple text show how ice cream is made in a factory, covering every step from the cow to the cone.

For readers who want to know the truth behind the pints of Chubby Hubby and Phish Food, journalist and consultant -Edmonson (founder, ePodunk.com) offers an in-depth history of the business side of Ben & Jerry's, founded by Ben Cohen and Jerry Greenfield in 1978, including the ups and downs of running a successful company while remaining true to its original roots. While neither Ben nor Jerry agreed to be interviewed for the book, it includes material contributed by Jeff Furman, the current chairman of Ben & Jerry's board of directors. 

Ice cream : a history by Marilyn Powell

This small volume is an informal history of ice cream told as much through myth, anecdote, and allusion to literature and art as through facts. It is organized thematically, addressing such standard topics as the origins of ice cream, kinds of ice cream (ice milk, gelato, granite, sherbet), forms (soda, sundae, cone, novelty), ingredients, and the technology of ice cream making. The book is interspersed with ice cream recipes from various historical eras.

Looking for some children's books featuring ice cream in the storyline? Take a peek at these titles!

Best friends Gerald and Piggie are complete opposites but still manage to have fun together, but when Gerald takes too long to make an important decision, it may be too late to share with Piggie.

Two dogs, Spike and Cubby, get caught in a storm while trying to sail to their dream destination--the grand opening of Ice Cream Island..

Maybe a whole family of vamipires have moved to Bailey City. That's ridiculous, after all ghouls don't scoop ice cream.

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