May We Suggest? This post contains recommendations from a CPL librarian. To get your own customized recommendation, just fill out the May We Suggest form — you can expect results within 10 days. All suggestions can be found on the May We Suggest blog or by liking May We Suggest on facebook.

Be Yourself, Part 2

 

Hey Kids,

Sometimes it's hard to challenge expectations and pre-conceived notions to become who you are. Read on for many examples of people who defied stereotypes and limitations to be authentic. And don't forget to check out part 1 for even more great books about being yourself.

Bear Hugs,

Thorndyke

Boys do not cook, and girls cannot play sports--but in this book the pictures tell a different story.

This story imagines what it was like when Susan B. Anthony and Frederick Douglass got together for a cup of tea and discussed their struggle for civil rights.

Interstellar Cinderella by Deborah Underwood

In this outer space adaptation of the fairy tale in rhyme, Cinderella dreams of becoming a spaceship mechanic.

Follows a girl in the 1920s as she strives to become a drummer, despite being continually reminded that only boys play the drums, and that there has never been a female drummer in Cuba. Includes note about Millo Castro Zaldarriaga, who inspired the story, and Anacaona, the all-girl dance band she formed with her sisters.

Phoebe and Digger by Tricia Springstubb

Phoebe enjoys playing with her new digger while her mother is busy with the new baby, until a bigger girl grabs the toy at the park.

Amelia Bloomer, who does not behave the way nineteenth-century society tells her a proper lady should, introduces pantaloons to American women to save them from the discomfort of their heavy, tight dresses.

Little Kunoichi, a young ninja in training, is frustrated. Inspired by tiny Chibi Samurai's practice and skills, she works harder than ever--and makes a friend. Together, they show the power of perseverance, hard work, and cooperation when they wow the crowd at the Autumn Festival.

Lucía the luchadora by Cynthia Leonor Garza

When the boys on the playground tell her that girls can't be superheroes, Lucía is discouraged until her abuela reveals to her the power of the luchadoras.

At 9 years old, Eugenie Clark developed an unexpected passion for sharks after a visit to the Battery Park Aquarium in New York City. At the time, sharks were seen as mindless killing machines, but Eugenie knew better and set out to prove it. 

Amazing Grace by Mary Hoffman

Although a classmate says that she cannot play Peter Pan in the school play because she is black, Grace discovers that she can do anything she sets her mind to do.

This is a children's book biography of Grace Hopper, who played a prominent role in the early days of computers.

The cranky ballerina by Elise Gravel

Saturdays make Ada cranky because that's the day of her ballet class, and she hates ballet.

Grace for president by Kelly DiPucchio

When Grace discovers that there has never been a female U.S. president, she decides to run for school president.

Looks at the inspiring story of Joan Procter, a pioneering female scientist who loved reptiles.

The paper bag princess by Robert N. Munsch

Describes the life of the children's book author and illustrator, conveying her life at Folly Cove, her love of dance, and how she was able to create images of machinery, including those used in her book, Mike Mulligan and his Steam Shovel.

Players in pigtails by Shana Corey

Katie Casey, a fictional character, helps start the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League, which gave women the opportunity to play professional baseball while America was involved in World War II.

Winnie Finn, worm farmer by Carol Brendler

Winnie Finn raises earthworms, which help her neighbors win prizes at the county fair. Includes instructions on making a worm farm.

Offers an illustrated telling of the story of Ada Byron Lovelace, from her early creative fascination with mathematics and science and her devastating bout with measles, to the ground-breaking algorithm she wrote for Charles Babbage's analytical engine.

Violet the pilot by Steve Breen

Young Violet's only friend is her dog, Orville, until one of her homemade flying machines takes her to the rescue of a Boy Scout troop in trouble.

Katherine Johnson by Thea Feldman

Details the life and career of the brilliant mathematician who worked at NASA and helped plan the trajectories for the Mercury and Apollo missions, including the one that landed a man on the moon.

Ada Twist, scientist by Andrea Beaty

Ada Twist is a very curious girl who shows perseverance by asking questions and performing experiments to find things out and understand the world.

Hammer and nails by Josh Bledsoe

After her play date is cancelled, a young girl and her dad have a fun day tackling their to-do lists together.

Offers an illustrated telling of the story of Bobby Gibb and how her persistence led her to become the first woman to finish the Boston Marathon in 1966.

Zoom! by Robert N. Munsch

When Lauretta tries out a 92-speed, silver and gold, dirt-bike wheelchair, she gets a speeding ticket but also helps out her brother.

Examines the life of the English novelist, describing her sense of humor, intelligence, strong opinions, and observations of life in rural England.