Looking for a book that will keep you turning pages? This list features unique fiction titles, many with strong female protagonists, for fans of Elizabeth Acevedo, Taylor Jenkins Reid, Jonathan Safran Foer, and Tara Westover.

Also available in: e-book | audiobook | e-audiobook | large print

For years, rumors of the "Marsh Girl" haunted Barkley Cove, a quiet town on the North Carolina coast. So in late 1969, when handsome Chase Andrews is found dead, the locals suspect Kya Clark, the so-called Marsh Girl. But Kya is not what they say. Sensitive and intelligent, she has survived for years alone in the marsh that she calls home, finding friends in the gulls and lessons in the sand. Her interactions with other people, however, leave her open to suspicion.

The vanishing half by Brit Bennett
Also available in: e-book | large print

Weaving together multiple generations, from the Deep South to California, from the 1950s to the 1990s, Brit Bennett produces a story that is both a riveting, emotional family story and a brilliant exploration of the history of passing. The Vanishing Half considers the lasting influence of the past as it shapes a person's decisions, desires, and expectations, and explores the multiple reasons and realms in which people feel pulled to live as something other than their origins.

Single Person Having a Dance Break in their Home

 

Complete this square by hosting a home dance party or by choosing a dance activity of your choosing.

To host a home dance party you will need:

  • A Person or Persons interested in dancing (required)
  • Music (recommended)
  • Special Outfits (optional)
  • Disco Ball, Instruments, Scarves or other Accessories (optional)

 

Music Resources from the Library

  • Find dance music on Hoopla** or browse its Dance Your Way to Health video category.
  • Explore our Alexander Street American Music database,** which features an entire dance category. For other music and movement tastes, Alexander Street also has Jazz, and Classical Music options.
  • Check Out our Summer Jams playlists for more music ideas.

**Hoopla and Alexander Street databases are accessible with a Canton Public Library card.

 

ePrint and eAudio Highlights

How do you dance? by Thyra Heder
Also available in: e-book

People of all different shapes, sizes, and ages demonstrate how they like to dance, but one boy does not want to dance and wants to be left alone. A lovely tribute to dancers of all ages and styles.

Thorndyke the Large Brown Bear Typing at the Computer

 

Complete this 62 Days activity by learning something you didn’t know before about the Canton Public Library, or by asking us your questions about how the library works. 

 

Exercise Your Curiosity about the Library

  • Write a letter to Thorndyke. Our resident bear loves seeing your faces and hearing about you. Thorndyke will respond to a selection of questions  and comments he receives weekly on his blog. Simply address your letter to
          Thorndyke the Bear  
          1200 S. Canton Center Road
          Canton, MI  48188
  • Use the “Ask a Librarian” option on our Contact Us form to ask a reference question remotely.
  • Use Social Media to ask us a question, tell us how we are doing, or learn more. Find and follow us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

 

Meet the Staff

  • Learn more about Thorndyke, our library bear. You can find his life story on Flickr, or you can take a look at his family album.
  • Learn more about the folks who make the library tick. Explore a limited staff directory and meet a few of the people who keep CPL up and running.

 

Explore Hidden Gems of the Library

  • Have you noticed the art located in and around the library? For a full tour, take our art walk online. 
  • Get a quick look at our sorting room, our hub for all returning materials. This is where all the books that are returned via our outdoor Book Drop.

 

Learn about Library Beginnings

Take a Deeper Dive into Libraries

Explore these resources to learn even more about libraries beyond the Canton Public Library. We are just a small part of a larger tradition of community service.

Schomburg : the man who built a library by Carole Boston Weatherford
Also available in: e-audiobook | video | e-video

Amid the scholars, poets, authors, and artists of the Harlem Renaissance stood an Afro-Puerto Rican named Arturo Schomburg. This law clerk's life's passion was to collect books, letters, music, and art from Africa and the African diaspora and bring to light the achievements of people of African descent through the ages.

Child at bottom of stairs by Jukan Tateisi on Unsplash

 

Complete one READ square by setting a challenge. 

A traditional summer reading challenge takes the form of reading a set number of books, or a set number of pages, or even a set number of minutes. Recently, reading challenges have expanded in scope and offer many ways to broaden your reading horizons. You can choose any reading challenge that fits your needs, and here are a few suggestions.

 

Just the Data

  • Use our 62 Days of Summer tracking sheets to keep track of basic numbers. Write down titles as you read them, or color in time units. Choose the best method for you. 
  • Try Scholastic Summer Read-a-Palooza Tracker to track your reading streaks and unlock book donations.
  • If you’re focusing on numbers this summer, you might find that committing to a Goodreads challenge helps you keep track of your efforts and you can maintain it over time.

 

Gentle Guidance

One of the most basic reading challenges is Gene Luen Yang’s Read Without Walls Challenge. Only three books long, you read one book about a character who’s unlike you, one book about a topic you know nothing about, and one book in a format you don’t usually read.

 

Looking for Extras

  • Barnes and Noble has a Summer Reading journal for grades 1-6. Print and fill out the journal, and then it becomes a coupon for a free book.
  • Nicola's Books in Ann Arbor has a Summer Reading Club for grades K-8 in which participants can read to earn a series of $6 coupons.
  • Join SYNC, a free audiobook summer program for teens and gain access to select free audiobooks through July.

 

Laser Focus

Are you keen on a theme? Love westerns, or want to only read mysteries this summer? Penguin Random House has compiled a series of 20-book challenges all centered on different themes. There are even themes designed for readers who want to expand their horizons, including one made up of debut novels and one with many different genres.

Woman reading under a tree by Start Digital on Unsplash
Dancer in Brazil by Diego Rosa on Unsplash.jpg

 

 

Looking for inspiration to start your next dance party? Maybe you just need a rest from an endless succession of dance breaks?

Try some of the dance-themed reads listed below. Those intended for older audiences are further down. Those at the beginning might be appreciated by all ages.

And of course, there are always more dance books to be found in our library catalog. Use the search options to browse our collections, you can use keywords and subject headings to find different lists of items to browse. You can also ask a librarian for assistance.

Flora and the peacocks by Molly Schaar Idle
Also available in: e-book

In this wordless book with interactive flaps, a little girl named Flora forms a friendship with two peacocks as the three learn to dance together. You can find Flora in many other books if you can't get enough. She's also on Hoopla.

A sparkler in Surrey Hills Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty by Jamie Street from Unsplash

 

Complete one READ square by doing one thing to renew your interest in reading or to spice up your reading life.

 

Readers of all ages, interests, and skill levels sometimes have trouble generating enthusiasm to pick up a book. Maybe you are a young reader trying to gain skills, maybe you are a reader who hasn't found a book you truly enjoy yet, or maybe you are normally an avid reader who has lost the ability to concentrate on a story.

 

Regardless of what has caused your reading rut, try a few of these tips to get your reading spark firing again. Even if your reading pace has not flagged, use these tips to bring a fun twist to your reading life.

 

  • Return to a book you love. Familiar stories can be revisited without the same level of energy required to start something new. An old favorite can also bring comfort during a stressful time.

 

  • Explore a different format. Regardless of age or interest, there are picture books and graphic novels available for every level; a visual story might be more engaging. Or dive into an audio book and just embrace the sound of words. 

 

  • Grab a book of poems. Ranging from silly to serious, poems or novels in verse use a more minimalist approach to language that might be appealing.

 

 

 

  • Pair a book with a movie. Read and then watch, and then discuss with a friend or family member. Which did you like better?

 

  • Focus on writing. Try keeping a journal, writing a poem, or writing letters to people you love and miss seeing. Get your brain thinking about words.
Bend in the path through a forest near Marl Lake, Michigan
CPL Librarians Preparing to Sing Skinnamarink to Home Viewers

 

Complete one READ square by attending a virtual program or using our resources to DIY a library program at home. For our full program listings, please take a look at our Program Calendar. For programs that perfectly fit the READ square, and further suggestions, please read on.

 

Storytimes

  • Looking for stories, songs, rhymes, and fun? Try our Far and Away Storytime on Wednesdays.
  • Want to create your own storytime? Explore our Share a Story blogs that are full of story, song, and rhyme suggestions that you can use at home.

 

At-Home Literacy Ideas

Explore our Lit Lab handouts for early literacy activity suggestions that you can use at home. Visit our Kids page and scroll down to our list of Lit Lab handouts by theme.

 

Virtual Book Clubs

Click on the program titles below for descriptions and registration information.

Create your own virtual book club using Hoopla Book Club Hub, or stay tuned for new programs at OverDrive's Together We Read. Get suggestions for how to host online

 

Virtual Writing Group

Attend our Adult Writers Group and make writing a regular part of your literary life.

 

 

Return to the main READ blog post.

Head back to the 62 Days of Summer home page for more ways to participate in the summer program.

 

Can't get enough stories about literature and people who create and distribute it? Explore the following titles that touch on topics like the importance of books and libraries, the hidden lives of authors and librarians, and more. Books at the top of list may appeal to a wide age range, books at the end of the list are geared more for an adult audience.

How to read a book by Kwame Alexander
Also available in: e-audiobook

A poetic and beautiful journey about the experience of reading. Begins with planting oneself beneath a tree and leads to a book party one hopes will never end.

Dreamers by Yuyi Morales
Also available in: e-book | audiobook | e-audiobook | video | e-video

A celebration of making your home with the things you always carry: your resilience, your dreams, your hopes and history. It's the story of finding your way in a new place, where one beacon of hope and support is the local library.

Dog Reading a Book by Jamie Street on Unsplash.jpg

 

Complete a READ square by reading something, or by doing something to put yourself in a literary frame of mind. So whether you already have a book in mind, or you need a little help getting started, we have some ideas for you.

 

 

Head back to the 62 Days of Summer home page for more ways to participate in the summer program.

 

Parents and caregivers have many difficult jobs, but talking about hard things with kids can be one of the most challenging. These discussions do not happen once, but over and over again as children grow. Sometimes the hardest part is getting started. The following books and resources can help you begin. 

e-Picture Books

Also available in: print

Sulwe has skin the color of midnight. She is darker than everyone in her family. She is darker than anyone in her school. Sulwe just wants to be beautiful and bright, like her mother and sister. Then a magical journey in the night sky opens her eyes and changes everything. 

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